Hospitality insights from “Houshi”

Houshi (english) from Fritz Schumann on Vimeo.

The Houshi family has run a ryokan (traditional hotel) in Japan for about 1,300 years. But their highest priority isn’t taking care of guests. Instead, it’s two-fold:

  1. “Passing on our long history for future generations”
  2. Protecting their hot spring

That’s why they have to “bear with” and “endure” the work of hospitality. Day to day, this means they put their guests’ needs ahead of their own. Quintessential long game.

Adding further evidence to the shared heritage of hotels and prostitution, they used to have parties–every day–with “many hostesses and geisha.”

But that’s not their true beginning–their roots go back to a religious sense of duty. Their ancestral founder was a Buddhist monk.

Hospitality is a business with “many unimaginable responsibilities“, which create a “heavy burden” on the mind.

It needs to be clear who’s in charge–now and tomorrow. The Houshi family had been confused and worried about who would run the ryokan next, until they bent the old rules and accepted their daughter as the next owner.

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